Sufi singers and artists from Rajasthan to perform at SPICMACAY show

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    Jamshedpur : The SPICMACAY club of Jamshedpur Public School is hosting the recital and performance of the famous Sufi singers and artists from Rajasthan, for the students tomorrow.

    Bhavai is a genre of folk dance popular in Rajasthan state in western India. Traditionally, this genre of dance was performed by the female performers belonging to the Jat, Bhil, Raigar, Meena, Kumar, and Kalbelia communities of Rajasthan.

    It is assumed that this genre of dance was evolved from the exceptional balancing skills of the females of these communities developed to carry a number of pots of water on their head over a long distance in the desert.

    The male or female performers balance a number of earthen pots or brass pitchers as they dance nimbly, pirouetting and then swaying with the soles of their feet perched on the top of a glass, on the edge of the sword or on the rim of a brass thali (plate) during the performance.

    Kalbeliya is a nomadic community who sometimes introduces themselves as Nath, Jogi, Sapere and Sadhu. Their family business is to catch snakes. This comes in handy as they showcase a number of tricks using these snakes while giving spectacular shows in nearby villages and kasbahs and at their Jaj Mans place and thus earn livelihood for themselves. As the time changed they have made permanent lodgings outside the cities.

    The women of this community are expert in singing and dancing. In olden times the women use to sing and dance only on special occasions such as weddings, festivals etc. in their very own distinct style. As times changed these women started performing stage shows around the whole world and with it changed their dancing style as well as their attires.

    Their swaying dresses, made up of colourful beads give a distinct identity to the women of Kalbeliya community. What makes this attractive dress more interesting is that it is made by the Kalbeliya women themselves.

    A very interesting fact about them is that they never teach the folk arts to their children. They gain expertise in singing and dancing by watching the elders doing it at home.

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